Chinese Perspective: Social Science Keywords 

中华视野:社会科学关键词

I. A proposal for the series

Although Chinese economic development has attracted world attention and the diverse nature of both China and the Chinese has been universally acknowledged, China’s achievement in the social sciences occupies an insignificant position in the human knowledge system. Over the past century, Chinese scholars have made extraordinary efforts in introducing the theories and methods of Western sociology into the study of Chinese society. In the last 30 years, Chinese social scientists, in their studies of Chinese society, have managed to either extract concepts from Chinese cultural resources such as “bao” (reciprocation), “mianzi” (face) and “guanxi” (deferential relationship), or replenish the existing concepts with Chinese elements such as reciprocity or social exchange.
     Just as the Chinese economy has developed from merely manufacturing to a mix of solid production and R & D development, social study in China should also shift its focus from the mere import of Western thoughts to the export and contribution to the world of some of the Chinese achievements in social studies. Our proposal is to edit a series entitled 'Social Science Keywords' from a Chinese Perspective. It will cover a wide range of topics including sociology, anthropology, politics, law, economics, economic history, management, social policies, international relations, gender studies, etc. The purpose of the series is to rewrite keywords of social science disciplines in order to renew outdated concepts in relevant textbooks in the West. By offering a uniquely Chinese perspective about the study of social sciences, the editors hope that their work can stimulate genuine global dialogue between cultures and thus add value to the world knowledge system.
     Each volume would consist of three key concepts and each concept should be from 25,000 to 30,000 words. Based on their understanding of social sciences' key concepts in the West, the writers, Chinese scholars inside or outside China, would draw on their own cultural resources for theories and concepts that address problems of worldwide concern. Using empirical research methods, they would integrate Chinese concepts into Western social science studies and thus present an alternative to the solely Western frame of thought. This series should be scholarly but also strive for maximum readability and usability. The series should have both Chinese and English versions, targeting a wide range of audiences such as Chinese, overseas Chinese and all those who are interested in China and Chinese culture and society. It also can serve as ideal supplementary materials for foreigners who study Chinese.
     The editors of the series are Martin Albrow, Xiangqun Chang and Xiaoying Zhang (see Appendix 1 for their short bios). We will invite specialists worldwide to form the editorial board. On the one hand, they will be asked to make comments or review the books; on the other hand, it is hoped the book series will be included in their reading lists for teaching and research. We would edit the series jointly, Chang being responsible for identifying Chinese authors in the social sciences based on her long experience of comparative studies between China and the West, and Zhang for organizing the translation and editing of the books into English based on her expertise. Albrow will be responsible for assessing the viability and quality of the English translation. We will invite specialists worldwide to form the editorial board. The complete works, with the approval of the four editors, will then be recommended to the editorial board and submitted to the publisher for proofreading.
     The series, funded by the Social Sciences Academic Press (SSAP), will start from September 2013, and is scheduled to be completed in the next five years. To guarantee the quality of the book, every book will go through the three-step procedure of the publishing house. The book is allowed to be published only when it meets the requirements. Appendix 2 includes some of the disciplines and relevant key concepts for your reference. Those who are interested in submitting their own books, please submit your CV (200 words), abstract and key words (1,000 words) before December 2012. Should you have any questions, please contact Dr. Chang Xiangqun at x.chang@ccpn-global.org

Bionotes of the proposers

Professor Martin Albrow:   Academician of Academy of Social Sciences  (AcSS); Honorary vice President &  former President of the British  Sociological Association (BSA), UK; Senior Fellow of The Käte Hamburger Centre for Advanced Studies, University of Bonn, Germany; Emeritus Professor of  University of Wales; founding editor of International Sociology, author of The Global Age: State and Society beyond Modernity (1996), Max Weber's Construction of Social Theory (1990) and Bureaucracy (1970).
Dr Xiangqun Chang: Director of CCPN Global, Editor of Journal of China in Comparative Perspective(JCCP), and the Chief Editor of Global China Press; she is Research Associate of SOAS China Institute, University of London, UK; and is a Special term Professor of Fudan University, China. She is the only UK-based scholar who trained in both China and the UK in sociology with publications of two million Chinese characters and English words; author of Guanxi or Li shang wanglai? --- Reciprocity, Social Support Networks, & Social Creativity in a Chinese Village (2009; 2010).
Dr Zhang Xiaoying: associate professor of English and international journalism at Beijing Foreign Studies University. Her specialties include language education, media discourse, cross-cultural communication and global studies. After BA degrees from both Zhejiang University and Shanghai International Studies University she received an MA in Modern British Studies from Warwick University, the UK. She received her PhD in cross-cultural communication from Beijing Foreign Studies University. After spells in the Ministry of Education and as a diplomat in the Chinese Consulate-general in Sydney, Australia, she has worked as a Deputy Dean and Head of Journalism Department in the School of English and International Studies at BFSU while teaching English reading skills, British studies and media discourse analysis. She contributes to the Chinese and British press and has published papers on media both in China and in the West. In 2010/11 she was a Visiting Fellow in Cambridge University researching the discursive construction of globalization in the magazine The Economist. Her book The Economist’s Construction of Globalization: A Narrative Analysis with a Chinese Perspective was published in July, 2012. And her translation of the book by Ann Lee, American professor, What the US can Learn from China will be published in August/September, 2012. 

A list of proposed concepts

After discussion with some Chinese scholars we have proposed the list of concepts as examples in different disciplines below:

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology I
Social relationships, by Xiangqun Chang
Social capital, by Yanjie Bian
Social networks, by Jiade Luo

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology II
Social structure, by Peilin Li
Social stratification, by Qiang Li
Community, by Huang Ping

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology III
Social operation, by Hangsheng Zheng
Society building, by Xueyi Lu
Social creativity, by Xiangqun Chang

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Anthropology I
Gift exchange, by Yunxiang Yan
Social exchange, by Mayfair Yang
Reciprocity, by Xiangqun Chang

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Political Science
Political participation, by Qi Wang
Political culture, by Qi Wang 

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Economic history
Private ownership by Kent Deng
Private property rights, by Kent Deng
Social mobility, by Kent Deng

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Gender studies
Gender, by Xiaojiang Li
Sexuality, by Xiaojiang Li
Women’s study, by Xiaojiang Li

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Management studies

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Law

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Economics

(to be updated)

中华视野:社会科学关键词

I. 对系列的建议

Although Chinese economic development has attracted world attention and the diverse nature of both China and the Chinese has been universally acknowledged, China’s achievement in the social sciences occupies an insignificant position in the human knowledge system. Over the past century, Chinese scholars have made extraordinary efforts in introducing the theories and methods of Western sociology into the study of Chinese society. In the last 30 years, Chinese social scientists, in their studies of Chinese society, have managed to either extract concepts from Chinese cultural resources such as “bao” (reciprocation), “mianzi” (face) and “guanxi” (deferential relationship), or replenish the existing concepts with Chinese elements such as reciprocity or social exchange.
     Just as the Chinese economy has developed from merely manufacturing to a mix of solid production and R & D development, social study in China should also shift its focus from the mere import of Western thoughts to the export and contribution to the world of some of the Chinese achievements in social studies. Our proposal is to edit a series entitled 'Social Science Keywords' from a Chinese Perspective. It will cover a wide range of topics including sociology, anthropology, politics, law, economics, economic history, management, social policies, international relations, gender studies, etc. The purpose of the series is to rewrite keywords of social science disciplines in order to renew outdated concepts in relevant textbooks in the West. By offering a uniquely Chinese perspective about the study of social sciences, the editors hope that their work can stimulate genuine global dialogue between cultures and thus add value to the world knowledge system.
     Each volume would consist of three key concepts and each concept should be from 25,000 to 30,000 words. Based on their understanding of social sciences' key concepts in the West, the writers, Chinese scholars inside or outside China, would draw on their own cultural resources for theories and concepts that address problems of worldwide concern. Using empirical research methods, they would integrate Chinese concepts into Western social science studies and thus present an alternative to the solely Western frame of thought. This series should be scholarly but also strive for maximum readability and usability. The series should have both Chinese and English versions, targeting a wide range of audiences such as Chinese, overseas Chinese and all those who are interested in China and Chinese culture and society. It also can serve as ideal supplementary materials for foreigners who study Chinese.
     The editors of the series are Martin Albrow, Xiangqun Chang and Xiaoying Zhang (see Appendix 1 for their short bios). We will invite specialists worldwide to form the editorial board. On the one hand, they will be asked to make comments or review the books; on the other hand, it is hoped the book series will be included in their reading lists for teaching and research. We would edit the series jointly, Chang being responsible for identifying Chinese authors in the social sciences based on her long experience of comparative studies between China and the West, and Zhang for organizing the translation and editing of the books into English based on her expertise. Albrow will be responsible for assessing the viability and quality of the English translation. We will invite specialists worldwide to form the editorial board. The complete works, with the approval of the four editors, will then be recommended to the editorial board and submitted to the publisher for proofreading.
     The series, funded by the Social Sciences Academic Press (SSAP), will start from September 2013, and is scheduled to be completed in the next five years. To guarantee the quality of the book, every book will go through the three-step procedure of the publishing house. The book is allowed to be published only when it meets the requirements. Appendix 2 includes some of the disciplines and relevant key concepts for your reference. Those who are interested in submitting their own books, please submit your CV (200 words), abstract and key words (1,000 words) before December 2012. Should you have any questions, please contact Dr. Chang Xiangqun at x.chang@ccpn-global.org

建议者的生平

马丁•阿尔布劳(Martin Albrow)教授:英国社会学会名誉副会长,英国社会学会前会长;德国波恩大学高研院院士;英国威尔士大学荣休教授;《国际社会学》创刊主编;著有《全球时代:超越现代性的国家与社会》 (The Global Age: State and Society beyond Modernity, 1996), Max Weber's Construction of Social Theory (1990) and Bureaucracy (1970).
常向群博士:全球中国比较研究会会长,《中国比较研究》主编,全球中国出版社总编;英国伦敦大学亚非学院中国研究院研究员;中国复旦大学社会文化人类学中心特聘教授。代表作《关系抑或礼尚往来?——江村互惠、社会支持网络和社会创造的研究》(2009;2010年)。
章晓英博士: 北 京外语大学英文及国际传媒学副教授。Her specialties include language education, media discourse, cross-cultural communication and global studies. After BA degrees from both Zhejiang University and Shanghai International Studies University she received an MA in Modern British Studies from Warwick University, the UK. She received her PhD in cross-cultural communication from Beijing Foreign Studies University. After spells in the Ministry of Education and as a diplomat in the Chinese Consulate-general in Sydney, Australia, she has worked as a Deputy Dean and Head of Journalism Department in the School of English and International Studies at BFSU while teaching English reading skills, British studies and media discourse analysis. She contributes to the Chinese and British press and has published papers on media both in China and in the West. In 2010/11 she was a Visiting Fellow in Cambridge University researching the discursive construction of globalization in the magazine The Economist. Her book The Economist’s Construction of Globalization: A Narrative Analysis with a Chinese Perspective was published in July, 2012. And her translation of the book by Ann Lee, American professor, What the US can Learn from China will be published in August/September, 2012. 

学术成果选列表  

After discussion with some Chinese scholars we have proposed the list of concepts as examples in different disciplines below:

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology I
Social relationships, by Xiangqun Chang
Social capital, by Yanjie Bian
Social networks, by Jiade Luo

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology II
Social structure, by Peilin Li
Social stratification, by Qiang Li
Community, by Huang Ping

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Sociology III
Social operation, by Hangsheng Zheng
Society building, by Xueyi Lu
Social creativity, by Xiangqun Chang

Social Science Keywords from a Chinese Perspective – Anthropology I
Gift exchange, by Yunxiang Yan
Social exchange, by Mayfair Yang
Reciprocity, by Xiangqun Chang

中国角度的社会科学关键词– 政治科学
政治参与 by Qi Wang
政治文化 by Qi Wang 

中国角度的社会科学关键词 – 经济史
私人产权 by 邓钢
私人财产权利 by 邓钢
社会流动性 by 邓钢

中国角度的社会科学关键词– 性别研究
性别 by Xiaojiang Li
性 by Xiaojiang Li
女性研究 by Xiaojiang Li

中国角度的社会科学关键词 – 管理研究

中国角度的社会科学关键词 – 法律

中国角度的社会科学关键词 – 经济学

(待更新)

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